House3
CLOSE
MENUCLOSE

The Ultimate Art Lover’s Guide To L.A.

Art

We scoured the city for the best galleries and museums

The East Coast-West Coast debate has had each side of the country puffing up its chest in defense of its superiority for ages. But the long-standing argument that the East Coast is the sole host to artistic culture, especially as it pertains to fine art, is becoming a bit more complicated. For years now, Los Angeles has been cultivating a fine art presence. In fact, it now has more museums than any other city in the country, an influx of galleries taking over retail leases, and thousands of artists moving west to fill them. And now, in 2018, the city is home to nearly 200 reputable galleries, and there’s no question that Los Angeles has established itself as the new mecca of fine art.

As a New Yorker who didn’t want to believe that L.A. could be capable of creating an artistic landscape comparable to that of my hometown, I set out looking for an art scene that I didn’t really think was there. Much to my surprise, it was—and then some. Because while geographically, Los Angeles is far too spread out to ever create a hub that will rival the Chelsea galleries (though, gallery row in Downtown is a close second), the city has managed to create a county-wide trail of galleries, museums, and public installations that are all worth seeing.

In the past, my trips to L.A. were punctuated by green juice tastings, celebrity sightings, and dusty hikes in the canyons. Outside of the museums, the L.A. art scene was tucked away, overshadowed by hints of Mr. Brainwash’s touch at nightclubs and the presence of stock photography of Marilyn Monroe in hotel lobbies. The focus of the city seemed to revel in the Golden Age of Hollywood, intercut with pop culture, and embody millennial health trends. It was confused, unfocused, and mostly unappealing to the artsy East Coasters. But after spending a week in the city unearthing a fine art scene, I’ve had to rewrite my perception of the city. Los Angeles is a far more artistically dynamic and progressive city than people on the East Coast give it credit for. This was made even more clear to me when I was warned by a few artists that comparing the Los Angeles fine art scene to that of New York could garner backlash. Alas, I believe it to be true.

L.A.’s thriving art scene spans from Venice to Downtown, with a notable presence in every neighborhood in between. Not sure where to begin your own Los Angeles art pilgrimage? Here’s your guide to the ultimate artsy L.A. trip.

John Gordon Gauld, 'Four-Cornered Eye', 2017. Currently at Wilding Cran Gallery

EAST SIDE

See: Wilding Cran, a contemporary art gallery which most recently hosted a realism show titled Really?curated by Beth Rudin DeWoody. Night Gallery, an artist-run contemporary art gallery known for its experimental evolution. The Broad, a contemporary art museum that opened in 2015, offers free general admission and always features exciting exhibitions (pro tip: Get tickets to visit far in advance of your actual trip). Hauser & Wirth, originally founded in Switzerland, is a modern and contemporary art gallery that represents international artists. CB1, a community art gallery that represents emerging and mid-level contemporary artists. MOCA Grand Ave, also known as the Museum of Contemporary Art, is small enough to experience in about an hour and has two other locations in L.A. that are included in a same-day admission fee. Maccarone, a contemporary art gallery that has a separate outdoor structure for sculptures. Garis and Hahn, a contemporary art gallery originally founded in New York City, recently opened in downtown L.A. to showcase conceptual narratives.

Stay at Hotel Indigo. Only a five-minute cab ride from the heart of the arts district, this Downtown hotel will be very familiar territory for New Yorkers who already frequent the Mr. Purple rooftop on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The newly opened Hotel Indigo has all the amenities you need and a very young, unstuffy crowd to hang with. You’re not going to spend a lot of time in your hotel room when you’re staying Downtown because there’s so much to do, but these clean, sleek rooms are more than accommodating for when you’re ready to tucker out at the end of the night.

True
Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

"In my head I thought, This is how it ends"

Kit Harington almost lost a lot more than the Iron Throne while filming the final season of Game of Thrones. According to an interview with NowThis News, the actor almost lost one of his balls while riding a mechanical dragon.

Harington revealed that the incident took place when he was filming the scene where his character, Jon Snow, takes a ride on Rhaegal for the first time in the Season 8 premiere. Since dragons aren't real (sorry), Harington was filming the scene, where Jon almost falls off the dragon and then swings around to pick himself back up, on a mechanical contraption.

"My right ball got trapped, and I didn't have time to say, 'Stop,'" Harington said in an interview. "And I was being swung around. In my head I thought, This is how it ends. On this buck, swinging me around by my testicles, literally." We see shots of the fake dragon he's riding in front of a green screen, and it does look pretty terrifying.

Luckily, his testicles remained intact through the near-disastrous event, and he's survived with quite the story to tell to unsuspecting journalists.

True
FROM THE WORLD WIDE WEB
Photo by Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for goop

"I had to create a harder shell about being a woman"

In a panel discussion during Gwyneth Paltrow's In Goop Health summit, actress Jessica Alba revealed that she "stopped eating" to avoid unwanted attention from men when she was first starting her career in Hollywood.

According to People, Alba said that she "had a curvy figure as a young girl" and, as such, was made to feel as though her body was the reason that men may be inappropriate toward her. "I was meant to feel ashamed if I tempted men," Alba said during the panel discussion. "Then I stopped eating a lot when I became an actress. I made myself look more like a boy so I wouldn't get as much attention. I went through a big tomboy phase."

She continued, "In Hollywood, you're really preyed upon. They see a young girl, and they just want to touch you inappropriately or talk to you inappropriately or think that they're allowed to be aggressive with you in a way."

Alba also noted that she was raised in a conservative household. "My mom would say, 'You have a body, and it's very womanly, and people don't understand that you're 12,'" she said. "I wasn't allowed to have my nalgas out, which is butt cheeks [in Spanish], but I was born with a giant booty, and they come out of everything. So, I didn't get to wear normal things that all my friends wore."

She said that these reactions to her body really affected her attitude. "I created this pretty insane 'don't fuck with me' [attitude]," she said. "I had to create a harder shell about being a woman."

According to her, her relationship to her body only changed when her first child, Honor, was born in 2008. "[After she was born,] I was like, Oh this is what these boobies are meant to do! Feed a kid!" she said. "And that was the dopest shit I'd ever done. So, I came into my body as a woman finally and I stopped being ashamed of myself."

True
Photo courtesy of Teva

Because of course

Teva, the most obvious lesbian footwear brand since Birkenstock, really knows its customer base. In time for Pride, the brand has teamed up with Tegan and Sara for a gay shoe to end all gay shoes. In other words, your Pride footwear is on lock.

The shoe isn't just your average Teva sandal. Tegan and Sara's design, the Teva Flatform Universal Pride sandal, is a 2.5-inch platform shoe with a rainbow sole. Tegan and Sara noted in a press release that they have been Teva wearers for pretty much their whole lives. "We got our first pair of Teva sandals when we were 16," they said. "This rainbow Flatform collab is like full circle LGBTQ+ Pride validation."

What's better, with each sandal sale, Teva will donate $15 to the Tegan and Sara Foundation, up to $30,000. The funds donated will go toward scholarships which will give young members of the LGBTQ+ community the chance to go to summer camps which will "help develop self-confidence and leadership abilities in a safe and nurturing environment." Tegan and Sara added, "Teva's generous support for our foundation will allow us to help even more LGBTQ+ youth."

Available today at Teva's and Nordstrom's websites, the sandal retails for $80.

Photo courtesy of Teva

NYLON uses affiliate links and may earn a commission if you purchase something through those links, but every product chosen is selected independently.

True
Asset 7
MORE in VIDEO
Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images

"Focusing on innovative materials will allow the company to explore new boundaries of creative design"

Prada Group has announced that Prada, as well as all of its brands, will now be fur-free. According to a press release from the Humane Society, Prada, Miu Miu, Church's, and Car Shoe will ban the use of fur beginning with the Spring/Summer 2020 collection (aka the Fashion Week coming up next). The list of fashion designers banning fur only continues to grow, with 3.1 Phillip Lim, Coach, Armani, Versace, Gucci, and more having stopped using the material in seasons past.

"The Prada Group is committed to innovation and social responsibility, and our fur-free policy—reached following a positive dialogue with the Fur Free Alliance, in particular with LAV and the Humane Society of the United States—is an extension of that engagement," Miuccia Prada told the Human Society. "Focusing on innovative materials will allow the company to explore new boundaries of creative design while meeting the demand for ethical products."

Following London Fashion Week designers forgoing the use of fur in September and the first-ever Vegan Fashion Week taking place in February, it's easy to imagine an entirely fur-free fashion future. It's especially easy, I presume, for the brands to consider a fur-free future, given that entire cities and states are taking a stance. New York is following in the footsteps of Los Angeles banning fur, with a bill proposed this March that would ban sales across New York State.

True
Photo by Johnny Dufort

"Club leisure" is the new athleisure

Alexander Wang is recognizing clubbing as the workout that it truly is with his latest Adidas collaboration. In this fifth installment, he "changes gears," per a press release from the brand, taking the iconic sports brand to the dance floor.

For the new campaign, the collection comes to life in iconic choreographer Tanisha Scott's dance studio and stars dancers Noemi Janumala, Dakota Moore, Avi McClish, and Olivia Burgess. The dancers show just how far these clothes can go when you want to bust a move or stretch, but TBH, I'll leave these poses to the pros and just use my clothes for flexing on the 'gram.

The collection—which features six apparel items, three shoes, and six accessories—features, per a press release, "Wang's knack for pre-styling." Standouts from the mostly black-and-white items include a silver sneaker that was *made* for moonwalking, an airy windbreaker that has just the right dash of bright blue with the scattered Adidas trefoil design, and a towel hoodie that you won't feel bad sweating in.

Ahead of the May 25 collection drop online and in stores, peep the gorgeous campaign images below.

Photo by Johnny Dufort

Adidas Originals by AW, Sweatshirt in Black, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Towel, $80, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Joggers, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Turnout BBall Shoes, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas.

Photo by Johnny Dufort

Adidas Originals by AW, Towel Hoodie, $350, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Sock Leggings, $60, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Adilette Slides, $90, available starting May 25 at Adidas.

Photo by Johnny Dufort

Adidas Originals by AW, Futureshell Shoes in Platinum Metallic, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas.

Photo by Johnny Dufort

Adidas Originals by AW, Sweatshirt in Core White, $280, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Shorts in Core White, $120, available starting May 25 at Adidas.

Photo by Johnny Dufort

Adidas Originals by AW, Sweatshirt in Black, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Bum Bag, $50, available staring May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Towel, $80, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Turnout BBall Shoes, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Duffle Bag, $70, available starting May 25 at Adidas.

NYLON uses affiliate links and may earn a commission if you purchase something through those links, but every product chosen is selected independently.


True