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The Secrets Behind The Exfoliating Toner Adored By Everyone

Beauty

Biologique Recherche opens up about the hard-to-find miracle product

Picture this: A biologist, physiotherapist, and doctor walk into a lab and come out with one of the most sought-after products in the beauty space.

No, this isn't the setup to a joke. Instead, it's the beginning of the story of one of France's premiere beauty brands, Biologique Recherche. Founded over 40 years ago, the brand has become known for its clinical-meets-holistic approach to skin care. Dr. Philippe Allouche, the co-owner and head of creation for the brand, says the idea behind the company is to “rebuild a fully functional epidermis in order to protect yourself” from free radicals, aging, dark spots, and whatever other problematic skin conditions you might have. The ingredients used are raw, concentrated, and pure; the packaging simple; the marketing, basically, non-existent. And yet the brand can be found right next to Sunday Riley and Glossier on nearly every influencer’s top shelf, largely due to its star product: the P50 lotion.

The P50 lotion goes by many names: holy grail, Jesus in a bottle, the Hermès of skin-care products. It's a chemical exfoliating toner (it includes acids like lactic, malic, salicylic, and others) and meant to fade hyperpigmentation, shrink pores, clear acne, and balance out the complexion. People obsess over it because it does all those things. Unlike other so-called miracle products, the P50 lotion isn't one-size-fits-all; there are actually seven versions of it on the market, meaning that there's an option for every skin type. The original, the 1970, is the most intense and includes the controversial ingredient, phenol, which has been banned in Europe (but not the U.S). Dr. Allouche tells me that he reformulated the original in the 2000s (though it's still available) because it proved to be too harsh for the skin. “The skin has changed over the decades, it’s more sensitive and thinner,” he says. The other options include the P50V, which is moderately strong; P50W, which is meant for sensitive skin; and P50 PIGM 400, which is specifically for combatting hyperpigmentation.

When you have a product that works, people talk about it. And post about it. And tweet about it. And that's exactly what's happened with the P50 lotion, a fact that has greatly benefitted Dr. Allouche and his team. The P50 lotion has always been popular, but, lately (at least in the U.S.), it’s graduated to cult status, even spawning a couple of copy-cats. When I meet with Dr. Allouche last week, though, it isn’t to discuss the lotion; they already know people love it. What the brand is focused on now is making sure customers know the magic potion also extends to body products and even a scalp treatment. “It’s not hair on one side and scalp on the other,” Dr. Allouche says. “They work together. The scalp is like the soil—it’s the temple for all of the hair products.” (We know this already, right? We’ve written about the importance of scalp care several times on this very website.) However, in the same way that the P50 works wonders, its scalp treatment, Biologique Recherche wants you to know, will do the same.

One thing that makes this brand unique, though, is how exclusive it still seems. With the kind of growth the company has experienced, most brands would understandably expand their distribution—but not Biologique. Right now, U.S. customers can only find the products online on Paul Labrecque and Rescue Spa’s websites, and Dr. Allouche plans to keep it that way. However, there are other spa partners consumers can visit nationwide. “We partner with people who we deeply believe can give the best to our clientele,” he says. “We love aestheticians. We love spas. All of these people are educated about the skin, and we think they're the best ambassadors.” When I ask him if he plans on making the products more readily available in the future, he shakes his head. “It’s just not the core of the brand,” he stresses.

Cue a sigh of relief from beauty lovers of all things elite.

Photo by Gareth Cattermole / Getty Images.

It marks her third duet with Nas

Here are some words that I never expected to read or hear again: There is a new song with Amy Winehouse. But here we are in 2019, and Salaam Remi has granted me a wish. On Valentine's Day, the Grammy-nominated producer and frequent Winehouse collaborator (also responsible for hits like Miguel's "Come Through & Chill") released "Find My Love" which features rapper Nas and that powerful and haunting voice that I have come to love and cherish so dearly.

Representatives for Remi said that the Winehouse vocals were from an old jam session the two had. Remi was a producer on both of Winehouse's albums, Frank and Back to Black. "Find My Love" marks the third time Winehouse and Nas have done duets under the direction of Remi. They were previously heard together on "Like Smoke," a single from her 2011 posthumous album Amy Winehouse Lioness: Hidden Treasures, and "Cherry Wine" from Nas' 2012 album Life Is Good. Winehouse died of alcohol poisoning on July 23, 2011, before they could complete production on her third album. My heart is still broken about it as she is by far my favorite artist.

"Find My Love" is set to appear on Remi's Do It for the Culture 2, a collection of songs curated by him. Check it out, below.

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Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images

"In the midst of chaos there's opportunity"

Following the travesty that was Fyre Festival, Ja Rule wants to take another stab at creating a music festival. Good luck getting that off the ground.

On Thursday, the rapper spoke to TMZ, where he revealed that he was planning to relaunch Icon, an app used to book entertainers, which is similar to Billy McFarland's Fyre app. He told the outlet that he wanted to create a festival similar to Fyre to support it.

"[Fyre Festival] is heartbreaking to me. It was something that I really, really wanted to be special and amazing, and it just didn't turn out that way, but in the midst of chaos there's opportunity, so I'm working on a lot of new things," he says. He then gets into the fact that he wants to form a music festival. "[Fyre] is the most iconic festival that never was... I have plans to create the iconic music festival, but you didn't hear it from me."

Ja Rule actually doesn't seem to think he is at all responsible for what came from Fyre Fest, claiming in a Twitter post that he was "hustled, scammed, bamboozled, hood winked, led astray." Even if that's his feeling, he should realize that anyone involved with Fyre shouldn't ever try their hand at music festivals again.

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