CLOSE
MENUCLOSE

Hillary Clinton Wishes She Called Donald Trump Out For Being A “Creep”

books
Photo By Monica Schipper/ Getty Images.

Yeah, us too

News that Hillary Clinton was going to be writing a reflective book of personal essays came out back in February, not long after Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president and not long after the two engaged in a contentious election. We were told it would also include her favorite inspirational quotes, all of which would help lay out stories from her life and her experience during the 2016 presidential campaign. Basically, there was potential that tea would spill, and the first excerpt, released today on MSNBC's Morning Joe, lets us know just what temperature that tea will be.

Let’s rewind back to a more naïve time—when we still believed there was good in the country—to the presidential debate in St. Louis. It was disconcerting, disturbing even, watching as Trump hovered over and followed Clinton around the stage. But, turns out, no one was more turned off by the situation than Clinton.

"It was incredibly uncomfortable," she wrote. "He was literally breathing down my neck. My skin crawled.” She goes on to talk about what she wishes she did versus what we all saw go down: a woman maintaining her composure despite being harassed by a disgraceful man on live television.

It was one of those moments where you wish you could hit pause and ask everyone watching: ‘Well, what would you do?’ Do you stay calm, keep smiling and carry on as if he weren’t repeatedly invading your space? Or do you turn, look him in the eye, and say loudly and clearly: ‘Back up, you creep, get away from me! I know you love to intimidate women, but you can’t intimidate me, so back up.’

I chose option A. I kept my cool, aided by a lifetime of difficult men trying to throw me off. I did, however, grip the microphone extra hard. I wonder, though, whether I should have chosen option B. It certainly would have been better TV. Maybe I have overlearned the lesson of staying calm, biting my tongue, digging my fingernails into a clenched fist, smiling all the while, determined to present a composed face to the world.

This is just one tidbit from the book, titled What Happened, hitting shelves September 12. She intros the book by explaining that she’ll be revisiting other “moments from the campaign that I wish I could go back and do over.” Adding: “If the Russians could hack my subconscious, they’d find a long list.”

Photo by Gareth Cattermole / Getty Images.

It marks her third duet with Nas

Here are some words that I never expected to read or hear again: There is a new song with Amy Winehouse. But here we are in 2019, and Salaam Remi has granted me a wish. On Valentine's Day, the Grammy-nominated producer and frequent Winehouse collaborator (also responsible for hits like Miguel's "Come Through & Chill") released "Find My Love" which features rapper Nas and that powerful and haunting voice that I have come to love and cherish so dearly.

Representatives for Remi said that the Winehouse vocals were from an old jam session the two had. Remi was a producer on both of Winehouse's albums, Frank and Back to Black. "Find My Love" marks the third time Winehouse and Nas have done duets under the direction of Remi. They were previously heard together on "Like Smoke," a single from her 2011 posthumous album Amy Winehouse Lioness: Hidden Treasures, and "Cherry Wine" from Nas' 2012 album Life Is Good. Winehouse died of alcohol poisoning on July 23, 2011, before they could complete production on her third album. My heart is still broken about it as she is by far my favorite artist.

"Find My Love" is set to appear on Remi's Do It for the Culture 2, a collection of songs curated by him. Check it out, below.

True

FROM THE WORLD WIDE WEB

Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images

"In the midst of chaos there's opportunity"

Following the travesty that was Fyre Festival, Ja Rule wants to take another stab at creating a music festival. Good luck getting that off the ground.

On Thursday, the rapper spoke to TMZ, where he revealed that he was planning to relaunch Icon, an app used to book entertainers, which is similar to Billy McFarland's Fyre app. He told the outlet that he wanted to create a festival similar to Fyre to support it.

"[Fyre Festival] is heartbreaking to me. It was something that I really, really wanted to be special and amazing, and it just didn't turn out that way, but in the midst of chaos there's opportunity, so I'm working on a lot of new things," he says. He then gets into the fact that he wants to form a music festival. "[Fyre] is the most iconic festival that never was... I have plans to create the iconic music festival, but you didn't hear it from me."

Ja Rule actually doesn't seem to think he is at all responsible for what came from Fyre Fest, claiming in a Twitter post that he was "hustled, scammed, bamboozled, hood winked, led astray." Even if that's his feeling, he should realize that anyone involved with Fyre shouldn't ever try their hand at music festivals again.

True