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Nike Unveiled The NBA Uniforms Of The Future

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Yes, there’s even a microchip

As Jerry Seinfeld once noted, jerseys are essentially what gives a sports team its identity. “You know, I love the Giants, but who are the Giants?” Seinfeld famously told David Letterman. “I mean, it’s different guys every year. Teams will move from city to city. You’re rooting for clothes, when you get right down to it. I want my team’s clothes to beat the clothes from another city.”

To most casual observers, the NBA uniform is a mousetrap product—you might be able to build a better one, but why bother? It’s a just uniform. But to Nike, the jerseys were another area in which the NBA could be dramatically improved. The sneaker and apparel giant won an eight-year contract to design the league’s uniforms in 2015, but this is the first season in which its jerseys will first be worn. 

On September 15 in Los Angeles, Nike unveiled these modern uniforms at a blowout event. Their Statement Edition uniforms are essentially alternate jerseys, typically the most stylish (or at least outré) of the team’s designs. The event itself, which took place at Sony Studios, featured a performance from Travis Scott, who performed wearing a Chris Paul jersey and self-designed sneakers. Reporters dodged monolithic video boards, playing reels composed from highlights and famous Nike commercials, as the boards moved through the space.

Those are nice details, but what about the uniforms? Well, they’re different—and much better. “I like them,” Lakers forward Julius Randle told me. “They’re lighter.”

“Good,” was Nets guard D’Angelo Russell’s one-word take. “We’ve got a uniform that keeps [the players] very, very comfortable,” VP of product innovation Kurt Parker said. 

Parker also said that the Nike team drew inspiration from its experience designing USA Basketball jerseys—though these are more heavy-duty to withstand the rigors of the NBA season—and college jerseys, to arrive at the current construction. That includes details like moving the shoulder seams off the top of the shoulder and onto the back, all in the name of creating a friction-free playing experience.

Also making their debut are the Nike Therma Flex Showtime Warm-up Jackets, which will be the first hooded product worn on the court. The hood enables players to keep their heads warm—eliminating the towels you see people hang on their head for temperature regulation—while also allowing players to hear and see their coaches and teammates. That’s because there’s a mesh patch in the hood, which is both unobtrusive and utilitarian. The jackets themselves, like the jerseys, are sleek on the inside and optimized for shooting jumpers during warm-ups. 

The uniforms are also much more technologically advanced. There’s a NikeConnect chip in the jock tag which connects to Androids or iPhones using near-field communication (NFC) and enables a fan experience that goes beyond just wearing a jersey to the game. I had wondered aloud why I, a grown adult man, would buy a new jersey to wear to a basketball game. This is the best argument yet. 

Using the NikeConnect app, you hold your phone near the jock tag, and it curates an experience customized to both the team and specific player. (Yes, it even works for Under Armor pitchman Steph Curry.) The content delivered includes shareable GIF and video highlights featuring mostly the player whose jersey you’re wearing, news from around the league, and exclusive game day experiences. Eventually, the app will also offer Spotify or Apple Music playlists based on what athletes are listening to on game day. 

“The same thing that KD [Kevin Durant] is listening to on game night, you’ll be able to download those and get in the same mindset as your athlete,” said senior director of product and experience Brandon Burroughs. 

They’ll also connect to your NBA 2k console game. If you buy a Kevin Durant jersey, he’ll be unlocked for you in the game. Each time you check in on game day, you’ll unlock skill boosts and upgrades within the game. 

All of this is nice, but the proof is in the look. This was a chance for every team to redesign the look and feel of their uniforms. Some delivered, others more or less fell on their face.

The Golden State Warriors had by far the best alternate jerseys of any I saw. The new logo said “The Town,” a reference to Oakland, which was accompanied by the oak tree glyph that residents will recognize from every street sign. The tree is a fantastic touch, both in terms of the local connection and visual appeal. 

Another standout were the Denver Nuggets’ new threads. Though the rainbow alternates have been ditched in favor of a simpler silhouette, they’re still connected indelibly to the city and its surrounding mountains. The yellow is also a nice hue, calling to mind the gold rush.

The Indiana Pacers’ uniforms evoke a basketball and are suitably utilitarian for the Hoosier state. You could picture Hickory High donning these as Gene Hackman coaches them from the sideline. They're simple but effective, like the ideal of Indiana basketball.

The only truly bad ones were the Timberwolves neon monstrosities. Not only are they vomit green, but they turn the forest of Minnesota into a weirdly garish experience that I wouldn’t wish on my worst enemy. That being said, maybe we’re all victims, as the team seems poised for their first playoff run in years. 

But despite that misstep, Nike, who has for years been the dominant brand on the feet of NBA players, has now positioned themselves to become as the future of uniforms in the NBA.

Photo by Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for goop

"I had to create a harder shell about being a woman"

In a panel discussion during Gwyneth Paltrow's In Goop Health summit, actress Jessica Alba revealed that she "stopped eating" to avoid unwanted attention from men when she was first starting her career in Hollywood.

According to People, Alba said that she "had a curvy figure as a young girl" and, as such, was made to feel as though her body was the reason that men may be inappropriate toward her. "I was meant to feel ashamed if I tempted men," Alba said during the panel discussion. "Then I stopped eating a lot when I became an actress. I made myself look more like a boy so I wouldn't get as much attention. I went through a big tomboy phase."

She continued, "In Hollywood, you're really preyed upon. They see a young girl, and they just want to touch you inappropriately or talk to you inappropriately or think that they're allowed to be aggressive with you in a way."

Alba also noted that she was raised in a conservative household. "My mom would say, 'You have a body, and it's very womanly, and people don't understand that you're 12,'" she said. "I wasn't allowed to have my nalgas out, which is butt cheeks [in Spanish], but I was born with a giant booty, and they come out of everything. So, I didn't get to wear normal things that all my friends wore."

She said that these reactions to her body really affected her attitude. "I created this pretty insane 'don't fuck with me' [attitude]," she said. "I had to create a harder shell about being a woman."

According to her, her relationship to her body only changed when her first child, Honor, was born in 2008. "[After she was born,] I was like, Oh this is what these boobies are meant to do! Feed a kid!" she said. "And that was the dopest shit I'd ever done. So, I came into my body as a woman finally and I stopped being ashamed of myself."

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FROM THE WORLD WIDE WEB
Photo courtesy of Teva

Because of course

Teva, the most obvious lesbian footwear brand since Birkenstock, really knows its customer base. In time for Pride, the brand has teamed up with Tegan and Sara for a gay shoe to end all gay shoes. In other words, your Pride footwear is on lock.

The shoe isn't just your average Teva sandal. Tegan and Sara's design, the Teva Flatform Universal Pride sandal, is a 2.5-inch platform shoe with a rainbow sole. Tegan and Sara noted in a press release that they have been Teva wearers for pretty much their whole lives. "We got our first pair of Teva sandals when we were 16," they said. "This rainbow Flatform collab is like full circle LGBTQ+ Pride validation."

What's better, with each sandal sale, Teva will donate $15 to the Tegan and Sara Foundation, up to $30,000. The funds donated will go toward scholarships which will give young members of the LGBTQ+ community the chance to go to summer camps which will "help develop self-confidence and leadership abilities in a safe and nurturing environment." Tegan and Sara added, "Teva's generous support for our foundation will allow us to help even more LGBTQ+ youth."

Available today at Teva's and Nordstrom's websites, the sandal retails for $80.

Photo courtesy of Teva

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Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images

"Focusing on innovative materials will allow the company to explore new boundaries of creative design"

Prada Group has announced that Prada, as well as all of its brands, will now be fur-free. According to a press release from the Humane Society, Prada, Miu Miu, Church's, and Car Shoe will ban the use of fur beginning with the Spring/Summer 2020 collection (aka the Fashion Week coming up next). The list of fashion designers banning fur only continues to grow, with 3.1 Phillip Lim, Coach, Armani, Versace, Gucci, and more having stopped using the material in seasons past.

"The Prada Group is committed to innovation and social responsibility, and our fur-free policy—reached following a positive dialogue with the Fur Free Alliance, in particular with LAV and the Humane Society of the United States—is an extension of that engagement," Miuccia Prada told the Human Society. "Focusing on innovative materials will allow the company to explore new boundaries of creative design while meeting the demand for ethical products."

Following London Fashion Week designers forgoing the use of fur in September and the first-ever Vegan Fashion Week taking place in February, it's easy to imagine an entirely fur-free fashion future. It's especially easy, I presume, for the brands to consider a fur-free future, given that entire cities and states are taking a stance. New York is following in the footsteps of Los Angeles banning fur, with a bill proposed this March that would ban sales across New York State.

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Photo by Johnny Dufort

"Club leisure" is the new athleisure

Alexander Wang is recognizing clubbing as the workout that it truly is with his latest Adidas collaboration. In this fifth installment, he "changes gears," per a press release from the brand, taking the iconic sports brand to the dance floor.

For the new campaign, the collection comes to life in iconic choreographer Tanisha Scott's dance studio and stars dancers Noemi Janumala, Dakota Moore, Avi McClish, and Olivia Burgess. The dancers show just how far these clothes can go when you want to bust a move or stretch, but TBH, I'll leave these poses to the pros and just use my clothes for flexing on the 'gram.

The collection—which features six apparel items, three shoes, and six accessories—features, per a press release, "Wang's knack for pre-styling." Standouts from the mostly black-and-white items include a silver sneaker that was *made* for moonwalking, an airy windbreaker that has just the right dash of bright blue with the scattered Adidas trefoil design, and a towel hoodie that you won't feel bad sweating in.

Ahead of the May 25 collection drop online and in stores, peep the gorgeous campaign images below.

Photo by Johnny Dufort

Adidas Originals by AW, Sweatshirt in Black, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Towel, $80, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Joggers, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Turnout BBall Shoes, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas.

Photo by Johnny Dufort

Adidas Originals by AW, Towel Hoodie, $350, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Sock Leggings, $60, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Adilette Slides, $90, available starting May 25 at Adidas.

Photo by Johnny Dufort

Adidas Originals by AW, Futureshell Shoes in Platinum Metallic, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas.

Photo by Johnny Dufort

Adidas Originals by AW, Sweatshirt in Core White, $280, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Shorts in Core White, $120, available starting May 25 at Adidas.

Photo by Johnny Dufort

Adidas Originals by AW, Sweatshirt in Black, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Bum Bag, $50, available staring May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Towel, $80, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Turnout BBall Shoes, $250, available starting May 25 at Adidas; Adidas Originals by AW, Duffle Bag, $70, available starting May 25 at Adidas.

NYLON uses affiliate links and may earn a commission if you purchase something through those links, but every product chosen is selected independently.


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Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

And Nikolaj Coster-Waldau's reaction to that prediction is literally all of us

Though it felt like no one saw the bonkers end to Game of Thrones coming, Gwendoline Christie, who played Ser Brienne of Tarth on the show, predicted exactly who would end up with the majority of power in the Seven, or rather, Six Kingdoms years before it all went down. During an interview leading up to the penultimate season of Game of Thrones in 2017, Christie sat down with Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (aka Jaime Lannister) for an interview with Mario Lopez, and they were both asked to predict how the whole thing would come to a close. Spoilers ahead...

Lopez posed the question, "If you were a gambling man, who would you say?" Coster-Waldau replied: "Well gambling, the odds now are clearly in Daenerys Targaryan's favor. Or, that guy," he said, pointing to a picture of the Night King.

But Christie, knowing Game of Thrones' tendencies toward the unpredictable, came right back at Coster-Waldau, asking, "But don't you think it's going to be someone out of left field?"

"So I'm wondering if it might be Bran," Christie suggested, "Just because we keep seeing the world from his perspective, don't we? We keep seeing the visions. So is he in the future, projecting in the past?"

Coster-Waldau's reaction to the suggestion that Bran will rule over them all is, well, exactly how we all felt watching it play out in real time this past Sunday evening. "The three eyed raven? As a king? No, that doesn't make sense," he said. And, well, same. Because while I usually *adore* watching Christie shut down Coster-Waldau, like they're an old married couple bickering, this time I'm on his side. It made no sense!

Coster-Waldau attempted to reason with her, saying that if Bran was planning the whole thing, then he wanted Jaime to push him out the window, and that makes no sense at all. But Christie stood firm in her belief, and, as last Sunday demonstrated, her commitment to this highly improbably outcome paid off. We hope she placed a sizable bet in Vegas.

Catch the full clip below.

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