Gigi Hadid, Ruby Rose, Lena Dunham, And More Explain Why Perfection Is A Lie

    #PerfectNever

    by · December 13, 2016

    Photograph by Nina Westervelt.

    There is no such thing as perfection. Just ask some of the most empowering, trailblazing, and seemingly "perfect" names of today.

    Last week we had the opportunity to do just that when Reebok hosted an event aimed at crushing the unrealistic expectations surrounding the unattainable notion of perfection. Empowering attendees to be "more human" and better versions of themselves, not just physically but also mentally, the five-hour #PerfectNever Revolution was led by Reebok's newest campaign spokesperson, supermodel Gigi Hadid. Kicking off with a group self-defense class hosted by Hadid and her trainer and founder of Gotham City Gym, Rob Piela, the event was followed by a panel discussion between Hadid, Girls creator and co-founder of Lenny Letter Lena Dunham, Olympic gymnast Aly Raisman, actor Ruby Rose, and musician Zoë Kravitz. During the panel—moderated by baseball commentator Jessica Mendoza, a pioneer in her own right as the first female ESPN MLB game analyst—the power group flipped the conventional definition of perfection on its head and celebrated their own imperfections and the challenges that contributed to making them the strong women they are today.

    Rose touched on the impact high school bullying had on her. "I wouldn't take back my childhood for anything because it taught me so much. All the time that I got to spend working on myself, the girls and boys that were spending their time bullying me and giving me all their attention weren't working on themselves," she said. "All the things that everybody teased me about are what have gotten me so far in my career today." Raisman chimed in, revealing that in middle and high school, she was teased about how strong her arms were, with insults ranging from "gross" to "disgusting," something that she was self-conscious of until this summer. "It wasn't until this past August, during these Olympics, that I started loving the way my arms were and how strong they were," she said. "It took me being able to compete two times at the Olympics and being one of the best gymnasts in the world to take a step back and really think about how I have to be confident and how this body has made me into the gymnast that I am."

    While Hadid, once again, revealed that she finds her “tranquil place” and drowns out negativity through boxing, it turns out, she isn't the only one who finds her confidence and determination in the sport. Rose said that after high school, her "whole life changed," and she turned to boxing as a way to find strength and something "worth striving for." "It gave me discipline and really focused me on being strong," said Rose, who also credited therapy for getting her to a happy place that she's in now—a comment that prompted Raisman to reveal that she tried out therapy for the first time the day prior to the event. Hadid jumped in, saying, "I think a lot of people are scared to get help. And it’s so inspiring to hear when people say, 'This has really helped me.’" 

    Kravitz also pointed to mental inner peace as the pillar of one's strength. "My mom’s taught me that women are so strong, but the most important part of strength is being gentle. It’s so important to be gentle with yourself and with other people," she continued. "You can go down a rabbit hole of being mad at being mad. And what the world right now needs so badly is to be gentle with our self and be gentle with other people, and that’s where I think a woman’s strength lies." Dunham similarly looks to meditation as her coping mechanism: "My mom got me into transcendental meditation when I was nine because I was such an anxious child. That’s where I’m whole." Dunham, who's been vocal about her struggles with anxiety in the past, said, "That’s a place for me where things are just boundless, and there’s no judgment from myself of myself."

    The panelists also touched on the double standards they see when it comes to how the public treats women. "We [as women] always have to be happy. If you watch the Super Bowl and the quarterback doesn't win, they're allowed to be in a bad mood," said Raisman, perhaps alluding to the scrutiny that fellow gymnast Gabby Douglas underwent. "I think it's really unfair to us, as women, that we're not allowed to show emotion, but men are allowed to be in a bad mood." Dunham seconded that sentiment, pointing to the stigma surrounding mental health and women as evidence of the double standard: "We see it all the time in Hollywood with men going to rehab and people are like, 'Great, I hope he does well.' When women go to rehab, it's like the beginning of a downward spiral." Dunham emphasized the importance for the "24-hour woman" to take care of herself and seek help when the challenges and pressures of the everyday life feel too great.

    All the women agreed that, despite what it might look like from the outside, they are affected by the internet trolls. "I don’t look at my Twitter anymore," said Dunham. "I don’t need to go on there and see a million dudes telling me to go kill myself." While Dunham keeps her "environment safe" and escapes the negativity by ignoring the hateful comments, Rose advised to not take the comments close to heart to begin with. "Don’t take advice from an egg. It’s always an egg that is saying things to you," she said. Kravitz agreed: "It's hard, and it's really difficult, but we have to have compassion for those people who are saying negative things because those people aren't happy."

    Nearing the end of the panel, Raisman reinforced the idea of perfection as being problematic when it comes to how people view public figures. "I think that everyone thinks that anyone who is in some sort of the limelight, that they're perfect all the time, they don't have feelings, they don't have emotions, and they don't care if they see a comment that's negative. I don't know why or how it got to that point, but I think it's so unrealistic," she said. "Before you go out to compete, you feel like you're gonna throw up, you feel like you're gonna start crying because you're just so scared, you're so nervous. You have a minute and a half on a four-inch wide beam, and if you make a mistake, then you're done."

    Kravitz emphasized that in times like this, you cannot let self-doubt get in the way. "I'm not constantly feeling confident, but I had to find a way to clear that energy away from me for the most part, or as often as I can, because, genuinely, it gets in the way of me being creative," she said."I kind of always have to, over and over again, remind myself I am worthwhile. I am supposed to be here, and I do have something to offer. I do have something to say."

    At the end of the panel, Raisman summarized Reebok's ethos—be more human with all the flaws and imperfections—best: "I think it's time that women stop being so hard on themselves and I think that parents, with the next generation, they need to teach their kids to be more accepting, be more loving." Watch the video from the event, below, and click through the slideshow to read about some of the other things Hadid revealed during the event.

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    Last updated: 2016-12-14T23:15:48.000Z
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