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Six Affordable Brands That Make Truly Beautiful Plus-Size Clothes

Fashion
Photo courtesy of Premme

They’re designing with the plus-size girl in mind

Earlier this month at NYFW, labels such as Chromat, Savage X Fenty, Gypsy Sport, Mara Hoffman, Christian Siriano, and more showcased their Spring 2019 collections on bodies of all different walks, sizes, ages, colors, abilities, and more.

While these major labels are setting the tone for the industry to move away from unrealistic ideals and a focus on “straight sizing,” we’ll admit—runway clothing isn’t necessarily the most accessible. But because finding wearable, affordable, beautiful plus-size clothing should be, we rounded up the six brands that are helping you do just that. Check them out, below.

Photo courtesy of Coverstory

Coverstory
If minimalist, clean dresses, separates, and accessories are what you’re looking for, look no further than Coverstory. The selection of brands—including OAK, B.B. Dakota, Rachel Pally, and more—is expertly curated by founder Heidi Kan, and aims to serve the woman who craves a sleek and modern aesthetic. Carrying sizes 10 to 28, it’s essentially the Need Supply of size-inclusive brands. “Most plus-size retailers carry looks that are either very matronly or very sexy, whereas Coverstory has thoughtfully curated a selection of modern, clean, stylish essentials that will be coveted by women of any size,” says Kan.

As someone who has created a niche in the plus-size market, Kan believes that the market as a whole is only going to continue to grow. “The plus-size market has improved a lot in the last couple of years,” says Kan. “The large retailers are finally starting to listen and inclusivity is on every retailer’s mind. I believe all of the chains will follow J.Crew and add plus size to their selections. I wish the fashion industry was moving faster than it currently is, but any improvement is welcome.”

Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images

Savage X Fenty
Ever since the release of Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty, we knew that she was the ultimate champion of diversity. So when we caught wind last spring that RiRi was diving into the lingerie market, we knew it was going to be just as glorious display of inclusivity and self-love as her line of cosmetics. And, welp, as if her ad campaigns don’t speak for themselves, her NYFW show last week was one of the most size inclusive of all. Not only did she cast bodies of all shapes, colors, and sizes, she also cast not one—but two—pregnant models.

Savage X Fenty is not only an attainable lingerie brand, but also one that proves that sexy lingerie—be it sheer lace and cone shaped pasties or cotton bralettes and boy shorts—can be worn and enjoyed by all bodies.

Photo courtesy of All 67

All 67
The plus-size market is lacking in high-quality and stylish designs of all types—including outerwear. And if you’re above a size 12 or 14, you’re probably familiar with the struggle it is to find a quality leather moto jacket. That’s where All 67 comes in.

Designer Jeff Cafone started his career as a touring musician and fell into design after he taught himself to sew. Once he began creating bespoke leather jackets for women of all shapes and sizes (including the cast of Orange Is the New Black and for employees at Buzzfeed and Condé Nast), he realized how appreciative women who wore larger sizes were. “The experience was very emotional,” says Cafone. “They told me they had never had access to the fit and quality and style that I was making. That led me to explore the state of extended size fashion and survey the options available, or lack thereof, in the market. I was shocked at the lack of quality and representation.”

From there, Cafone created All 67 last year, representing the 67 percent of the population that struggles to find covetable clothing in extended sizing (aka sizes 12 to 28). The brand is focused on affordable luxury, which began with leather moto jackets and will continue to grow into a collection of elevated staples, including dresses, separates, and accessories, “Our focus is on cost per wear, allowing the customer to see and feel the quality that has been sadly lacking in the market,” says Cafone. Filling these voids, whether outerwear or any other niche, is what Cafone believes will continue in the plus-size market, until it fully serves the customer better than the legacy brands that have failed everyone who doesn't fit into the "straight size" mold.

Photo courtesy of CoEdition

CoEdition
Back in March 2018, a team of fashion professionals seeking to transform the plus-size fashion industry—and the fashion industry as a whole—launched CoEdition, a multi-brand e-commerce site catering to those who wear size 10 and up.

While it may still be under a year-old, it's quickly become a one-stop shop for all things fashion. Currently, it carries a mix of popular contemporary fashion labels such as Rachel Roy and Stuart Weitzman, as well as newer, emerging brands like Margaux and Warp + Weft, and even a handful of international labels. In less than a year, it’s collaborated with labels like Hutch and Bruna Malucelli, and while it already carries over 40 stylish, inclusive brands, it hopes to expand to carrying 150 by the end of the year, covering the ready-to-wear, accessories, swim, and intimates categories.

Photo courtesy of Premme

Premme
Chances are, you’re already familiar with household names Nicolette Mason and Gabi Gregg, two influencers making waves in the world of plus-size fashion. Last year, the two teamed up to launch their very own fashion label, Premme, which, needless to say, was a hit. The collection featured everything from striped off-the-shoulder tops, wide-leg trousers, and figure-hugging denim—bold pieces that allowed for self-expression and were carried in sizes 12 to 32. “Premme was born out of a love of fashion and the recognition that the industry is still lacking when it comes to the wants and needs of plus-size women,” Mason told me over email. “We believe babes of all sizes deserve bold, fashion-forward statement pieces without compromise.”

While the brand had taken a short hiatus, Phase 2 is set to launch this Friday. And while we don’t know everything that’ll be included, we do know that the brand’s cult-favorite Marissa set (which casually sold out in under nine hours during the initial launch) is due to make a comeback. Keep your eyes peeled!

Photo courtesy of Universal Standards

Universal Standard
If there’s one way to describe the Universal Standard girl, it’s that she exudes a certain kind of downtown cool. She opts for clean lines and a minimalist aesthetic, wearing styles that are relaxed and professional. And she wants these styles in sizes she can actually wear.

From elevated classic tees and blazers to silky slip dresses and sheer button downs, Universal Standard has created an extensive line of elevated wardrobe essentials. But, most importantly, the label really has the inclusive sizing range down, carrying sizes 6 to 32 in both regular and petite versions, with plans to “expand the sizing range in both directions.”

Founders Polina Veksler and Alex Waldman created their line back in 2015, after creating their first eight-piece, size-inclusive collection that sold out in just six days. Now, they’re working to close the gap between the fashion industry and a separate plus-size fashion industry. “We firmly believe that the days of a separate ‘plus-size’ clothing industry are numbered,” says Waldman. “We’re working to create a future where plus-size and straight-size women shop from the same rack with taste as the only filter for choosing style. Fashion needs to be desegregated because it’s not just a matter of size, but also of design, variety, and quality. We need the apparel industry to evolve past the ‘us and them’ mentality that has been so deeply entrenched until now.” We couldn’t agree more.

Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Well, actually it's crocodile, but she looks out of this world so...

Winnie Harlow walked the Cannes red carpet on Wednesday on her way to a screening of Oh Mercy!, wearing a showstopping gown.

The sheer black dress featured green embroidery on the front and back, which Ralph and Russo confirmed was in the shape of a crocodile. She belted the dress with a black crocodile skin-like belt and finished the look off with some strappy heels. She didn't leave it at just that. For beauty, Harlow packed on full lids of sparkly purple eyeshadow. She kept her hair sleek and simple.

Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Though the brand says otherwise, as Game of Thrones fans, we'd like to think the embroidery is reminiscent of a dragon's skin. Not to mention, Harlow looks out-of-this-world beautiful in it.

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Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

That denim kimono!!

Marion Cotillard shut down the Cannes red carpet on Wednesday at a screening for Matthias Et Maxime. Instead of an extravagant gown that's expected of the event, Cotillard wore a matching black crop top and shorts. Despite wearing an outfit I typically don to a hot yoga class, she looks incredible. She completed the look with an oversized denim kimono, a statement necklace, and heeled booties.

Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

At first, I was drawn in by the crop top and hotpants duo, but, after looking closer at the kimono, it's clear that it's the real scene-stealer. The floor-length Balmain piece was decorated with artful rips and dragon motifs. I would like to live in it.

Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Let's all bow down to the Khaleesi of Cannes.

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Photo by Frazer Harrison / Getty Images.

"It doesn't make you weak to ask for help"

Singer Billie Eilish is continuing to open up about mental health, this time in a new PSA video in partnership with the Ad Council and Seize the Awkward.

In the video, Eilish insists that "it doesn't make you weak to ask for help." She doubles down on the importance of asking for help, and stresses the importance of friends and family being there when their close ones reach out and checking in on them as well. "You should be able to ask anyone for help, everyone has to help someone if they need it." According to Eilish, there have been times when someone reached out to her at the exact moment she needed it, and it helped.

It was particularly refreshing to see Eilish acknowledge that there are things she still doesn't know and has to learn about her mental health. At the very beginning of the video, the interviewer asks her to reflect on her mental health journey, and all Eilish can do is let out chortle. "I think when people hear, 'Remember to take care of your mental health,' they think that everyone else is, and that is not at all accurate," she admitted. "You know, for me I'm trying to learn still to make sure that I stay okay."

Check out the PSA below.

Billie Eilish On Mental Health & Friendship | Ad Council www.youtube.com

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Photograph via @kimkardashian.

"#NotOnMyMoodBoard"

Kim Kardashian has definitely been accused of borrowing a design now and then. But when Instagram influencer and Kardashian look-alike Kamilla Osman claimed the entrepreneur copied her birthday look for a Met Gala after-party, Kardashian was not going to let it fly—and shared plenty of photo evidence to shut down the claim.

Fashion industry watchdog Diet Prada first noticed Osman's claims on Instagram and shared side-by-side images of Kardashian's Cher-inspired outfit designed by Mugler and Osman's dress. "Never get confused with who 'inspires' who. They won't give you credit but they will copy," Osman wrote on her IG story. "I designed this dress for my birthday last year. Nobody had a dress like this was an original design."

Kardashian responded by posting the true inspiration behind her look: images of Cher, in similarly sparkly, plunging-neckline dresses and wigs, and of model Yasmeen Ghauri walking a Mugler show in the '90s. In fact, the only similarity between Osman's and Kardashian's looks is the bodycon mini-dress style, which the two are not the first to wear. Among the images, Kardashian included a blank slide with the hashtag "NotOnMyMoodBoard," making it clear that this was in response to Osman's claims.

Screenshot via @KimKardashian Instagram Stories

Screenshot via @KimKardashian Instagram Stories

Though I am with Kim on this one, Kardashian does have a history of co-opting other people's work. From being sued over her Kimoji app, to claims she copied makeup palettes and perfume bottle designs, to being accused of copying Naomi Campbell's entire style, it's far from the first (and probably, far from the last) time Kardashian's name will be mentioned like this.

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After delivered the perfect pep talk

When Lena Waithe took over as a guest host on Jimmy Kimmel Live, her first time ever as a late-night host, actress and friend Halle Berry knew exactly how to pump her up. After Kimmel's security guard Guillermo Rodriguez hit the "Berry Button" (a large button on the wall that says just that), Berry came running out in a backless tee and boyfriend jeans to give Waithe a pep talk... and plant one on her.

Berry rolled in as if she'd just jogged from hanging out with her friends to come to Waithe's immediate aid, joking she wasn't dressed for the occasion; but, let's be real, she could wear a paper bag, and we wouldn't complain. Waithe requested the "Halle Berry juice," similar to her 2002 Oscars speech, and Berry immediately had the lights turned down low and jumped into inspirational speech mode.

"I know that you are a force of nature. You are a beautiful African-American queen going after everything that is hers," Berry said before going on to list Waithe's many titles and accomplishments. She jokingly concluded, "And you already winning, girl, 'cause you are dressed way better than Jimmy ever will," before asking if Waithe needed anything else. Clearly, Waithe thought that was all Berry was there to do, because she said no, but Berry insisted she needed one more thing before grabbing Waithe's face and surprising her with a kiss. "Wow," Waithe reacted after Berry pulled away, and honestly same!

Watch the video, below.

Lena Waithe's Guest Host Monologue on Jimmy Kimmel Live youtu.be

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