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Four Spring Hair Makeovers That Will Inspire Your New Look

Beauty
Photographed by Ricky Michiels

Way beyond a trim

If you've ever seen Clueless, Mean GirlsJawbreaker, or just about any other classic teen movie, you're familiar with the transformative power of a drastic makeover. And after spending months indoors and hiding under parkas, beanies, and blankets, it seems as if there's nothing like one to renew our spirit and get us excited for the warm months ahead. Since taking our trusty old shorts and tank tops out of storage already makes it feel like we have an entirely new wardrobe at our disposal, we're huge proponents of the hair makeover as the means to a fresh start.

Last year, we opted for cropped cuts, colorful tresses, and a whole lot of bleach. This time around, we decided to rethink our approach, and really evaluate the health of our hair. Whether it meant opting for more natural shades, choosing more low-maintenance options, or trying some new reparative treatments, we got some of the freshest cuts and colors of the season. That didn't mean that we totally laid off the bleach, though. After all, habits are hard to break (especially when they look really, really good). 

Flip through four of our favorite makeovers below, complete with maintenance tips, and all of the information you'd need if you so choose to replicate them yourself. 

Photographed by Ricky Michiels

Gabrielle Korn, Digital Deputy Editor
I started bleaching my hair a few years ago, and since then it's undergone quite a bit of trauma. Even though I technically know better, I went all the colors of the rainbow in a very short period of time, ending on a cool-toned platinum white that was pretty much my favorite thing ever. That is, of course, until the day a large chunk of it (like right in the front) broke off in my hand. Then I had to take a good hard look at my life and make a choice between healthy hair and cool hair—and since cool hair was suddenly proving to be utterly unsustainable, I opted for the former.

I went to the newly opened Fourteenjay in Tribeca, where salon co-owners David Adams (color) and Frank Rizzieri (cut) examined my sad strands carefully. I showed them a picture of a shorter, darker bob—ever since watching Jessica Jones, I've wanted to dye my hair dark anyway. Using Aveda products, David applied a very warm-toned color treatment on my hair, which turned it an alarming red. He then shampooed it with the brand's Color Conserve Shampoo, treated it with a Botanical Treatment Protein, and finished with the Damage Remedy Conditioner. (Everyone who gets color at the salon gets a protein or moisture treatment because David says that healthy hair holds color better). To create this perfect chocolate brown hue, he finished with a permanent cream hair color, which balanced the red.

Because the ends of my 'do were so fried, Frank convinced me to bring my lob up to a more flattering, collarbone-grazing chop. I tend to like hair that looks a little fucked up, so he left the ends really choppy and longer in the front, with assorted pieces sticking out for an unexpected finish. Two weeks later, I returned to the salon for a gloss to seal my color in. I also stopped by Boom Boom Brow Bar to get my brows tinted to match my new color, which was the final piece in completing my new brunette vibe. I'm so into this look—I feel like it's a really unexpected spring change, and in a season of pastel hues, going darker feels bad in the best way.

She considers herself "one of the luckiest kids on the face of the earth"

Dani Okon, NYLON's associate creative director of video, sat down with her great-aunt, May Okon, to talk about their shared experiences—despite vastly different time frames—living as queer women in New York City. Prior to retirement, May was a journalist for the New York Daily News, having first entered the male-dominated workforce when "the boys were all at war." And, of course, she absolutely killed it. Her only regret? "Retiring at 55," she tells Dani, joking, "Who the hell knew I was gonna live to 100?"

Upon retiring, she moved out to the Hamptons with her partner and bought a home. If she had to do it all over, May says "there are a lot of things I wouldn't do," but she still considers herself "one of the luckiest kids on the face of the earth." Get to know May in the video, above.

Check out the other videos in our series where we placed queer people from different generations in conversation with one another:

Rob Smith and Eddie Jarrel Jones
Lauren Morelli and Garcia
Marlene Colburn and Naima Green
Ashlee Marie Preston and Devan Diaz

Produced by: Alexandra Hsie
Camera: Gretta Wilson + Katie Sadler
Edited by: Madeline Stedman

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Here's how they're making sure it doesn't happen

Lauren Morelli, the showrunner and executive producer for the new Netflix show Tales of the City, is fostering a space where multiple queer realities can be shown on-screen. She spoke with one of the cast members, trans actor Garcia (who plays Jake Rodriguez on the show), and, in the video above, they explore why it's wrong to treat queer stories as representative of the entire community. Tokenization is something that they both want to avoid at all costs, and they're on the right track.

Check out the other videos in our series where we placed queer people from different generations in conversation with one another:

Dani and May Okon
Rob Smith and Eddie Jarrel Jones
Naima Green and Marlene Colburn
Ashlee Marie Preston and Devan Diaz

Produced by Alexandra Hsie
Directed by Charlotte Prager
Shot by Gretta Wilson + Charlotte Prager
Edited by Gretta Wilson

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"Nothing is truly a binary"

We put non-binary activist Eddie Jarrel Jones and The Phluid Project founder Rob Smith in conversation with each other, and the two spoke some powerful truths about the continued gendering of products like makeup and clothing. Smith recalls that 30 years ago, the only way that he was able to experience the joys of playing with makeup was to work at a beauty counter. Even today, Jones notes that it's hard for non-binary femmes like them, or even trans women, to get that experience in stores.

In the video above, get a sense of why Smith created a genderless store, and see how important it is for people like Jones to have a space where they don't feel criticized for dressing like they want.

Check out the other videos in our series where we placed queer people from different generations in conversation with one another:

Dani and May Okon
Lauren Morelli and Garcia
Naima Green and Marlene Colburn
Ashlee Marie Preston and Devan Diaz

Produced by Alexandra Hsie
Directed by Charlotte Prager
Shot by Charlotte Prager + Dani Okon
Edited by Gretta Wilson

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We put the two activists in conversation

Marlene Colburn, one of the founders of the Dyke March, and Naima Green, an artist currently working on a project and archive called Pur·suit, which will document queer people of all identities, agree that it's really hard to find lesbian spaces that aren't bars. Just as hard, it seems, is to find lesbian representation that isn't white. In the video above, the two talk about how they are creating space for queer people and what that looks like within two different generations.

Check out the other videos in our series where we placed queer people from different generations in conversation with one another:

Dani and May Okon
Rob Smith and Eddie Jarrel Jones
Lauren Morelli and Garcia
Ashlee Marie Preston and Devan Diaz

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