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7 Female-Run Brands You Can Only Shop At Tictail

Fashion
Photos courtesy of Tictail

These are the women creating history

Ever since we first learned of Tictail, the Swedish-born global online marketplace that puts emerging designers and artists in the spotlight, we’ve turned to them for all of our shopping needs—especially when we’re looking for truly unique, standout pieces.

For Women’s History Month, Tictail is bringing back its Women Creating History campaign that first launched last year. Being that tens of thousands of female-run brands from 140 countries across the globe use Tictail as a platform to run their businesses, the retailer is making the space to highlight 31 of these women all month long. From fashion designers to artists, these ladies are redefining what it means to be a modern-day CEO.

We chatted with seven up-and-coming fashion labels, available exclusively at Tictail, to learn how they’re making waves—and history. From their innovative sustainability efforts to redefining comfortable fashion, these are the brands to know.

Learn a bit more about each one, below, and check out all 31 featured creatives, here.

Photos courtesy of Tictail

Anissa Aida
NYC-based fashion label Anissa Aida is the brainchild of designer Anissa Meddeb, who developed an early interest in design thanks to her architect mother and had dreams to one day run a line with her sister Aïda. After Aïda died in 2010, Meddeb, who had worked at labels such as Outdoor Voices and Marc Jacobs, paid tribute to her by creating Anissa Aida.

Meddeb melds together different cultures, as well as cultural influences of the past and present. First and foremost, she’s inspired by her Tunisian heritage and its traditional craftsmanship. Using sustainable materials, she draws from North African, Middle Eastern, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean influences, putting a modern spin on ancestral garments such as the kimono and caftan. “The collections meet halfway between East and West, past and future, tradition and modernity,” says Meddeb. "The chosen fabrics express and foster cultural exchange. From English oxford to Japanese linen and Tunisian hand-woven silks, such are all visual dialogues creating my unique perception of history.”

She considers herself "one of the luckiest kids on the face of the earth"

Dani Okon, NYLON's associate creative director of video, sat down with her great-aunt, May Okon, to talk about their shared experiences—despite vastly different time frames—living as queer women in New York City. Prior to retirement, May was a journalist for the New York Daily News, having first entered the male-dominated workforce when "the boys were all at war." And, of course, she absolutely killed it. Her only regret? "Retiring at 55," she tells Dani, joking, "Who the hell knew I was gonna live to 100?"

Upon retiring, she moved out to the Hamptons with her partner and bought a home. If she had to do it all over, May says "there are a lot of things I wouldn't do," but she still considers herself "one of the luckiest kids on the face of the earth." Get to know May in the video, above.

Check out the other videos in our series where we placed queer people from different generations in conversation with one another:

Rob Smith and Eddie Jarrel Jones
Lauren Morelli and Garcia
Marlene Colburn and Naima Green
Ashlee Marie Preston and Devan Diaz

Produced by: Alexandra Hsie
Camera: Gretta Wilson + Katie Sadler
Edited by: Madeline Stedman

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Here's how they're making sure it doesn't happen

Lauren Morelli, the showrunner and executive producer for the new Netflix show Tales of the City, is fostering a space where multiple queer realities can be shown on-screen. She spoke with one of the cast members, trans actor Garcia (who plays Jake Rodriguez on the show), and, in the video above, they explore why it's wrong to treat queer stories as representative of the entire community. Tokenization is something that they both want to avoid at all costs, and they're on the right track.

Check out the other videos in our series where we placed queer people from different generations in conversation with one another:

Dani and May Okon
Rob Smith and Eddie Jarrel Jones
Naima Green and Marlene Colburn
Ashlee Marie Preston and Devan Diaz

Produced by Alexandra Hsie
Directed by Charlotte Prager
Shot by Gretta Wilson + Charlotte Prager
Edited by Gretta Wilson

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"Nothing is truly a binary"

We put non-binary activist Eddie Jarrel Jones and The Phluid Project founder Rob Smith in conversation with each other, and the two spoke some powerful truths about the continued gendering of products like makeup and clothing. Smith recalls that 30 years ago, the only way that he was able to experience the joys of playing with makeup was to work at a beauty counter. Even today, Jones notes that it's hard for non-binary femmes like them, or even trans women, to get that experience in stores.

In the video above, get a sense of why Smith created a genderless store, and see how important it is for people like Jones to have a space where they don't feel criticized for dressing like they want.

Check out the other videos in our series where we placed queer people from different generations in conversation with one another:

Dani and May Okon
Lauren Morelli and Garcia
Naima Green and Marlene Colburn
Ashlee Marie Preston and Devan Diaz

Produced by Alexandra Hsie
Directed by Charlotte Prager
Shot by Charlotte Prager + Dani Okon
Edited by Gretta Wilson

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We put the two activists in conversation

Marlene Colburn, one of the founders of the Dyke March, and Naima Green, an artist currently working on a project and archive called Pur·suit, which will document queer people of all identities, agree that it's really hard to find lesbian spaces that aren't bars. Just as hard, it seems, is to find lesbian representation that isn't white. In the video above, the two talk about how they are creating space for queer people and what that looks like within two different generations.

Check out the other videos in our series where we placed queer people from different generations in conversation with one another:

Dani and May Okon
Rob Smith and Eddie Jarrel Jones
Lauren Morelli and Garcia
Ashlee Marie Preston and Devan Diaz

Produced by Alexandra Hsie
Directed by Charlotte Prager
Shot by Dani Okon + Charlotte Prager
Edited by Charlotte Prager

Illustrated by Sarah Lutkenhaus

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